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North Elba ‘games of chance’ law will be put to voters Nov. 2

LAKE PLACID — A proposed law that would allow games of chance in the town of North Elba is expected to appear on the ballot Nov. 2.

The North Elba Town Council on July 13 voted to send the law to the county Board of Elections to be placed on the ballot. It will need to garner support from a majority of voters to pass. The law was adopted by the town council in 2019, but the town missed the cutoff for it to appear on the ballot that November. The law wasn’t resubmitted last year.

The law would apply to games involving raffles, bell jars, merchandise wheels, coin boards, seal cards and merchandise boards used to raise money for charities, education, science or health-related causes, churches or synagogues, or “patriotic causes,” according to the law. Any organization that wants to host a game of chance for fundraising would need to first obtain a license from the state Gaming Commission, and that license would then be approved or rejected by the town. Though games of chance would be allowed on Sundays, they would be off-limits on Easter Sunday, Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

The town council also authorized a waiver for the Rotary Club of Lake Placid on Tuesday. The waiver will allow the club to host its annual Dam Duck Race. Tina Leonard, a local realtor and chair of the club’s Dam Duck Race planning committee, said the event will be at Lisa G’s on Saturday, Sept. 11 this year. Dinner will start at 5 p.m. and the race will start at 6 p.m. This event is the Rotary Club’s biggest fundraiser. The club is currently raising money to build bus shelters around town.

For the Dam Duck Race, people buy tickets and are assigned a rubber duck’s number. If a person’s duck crosses the finish line first, that person wins money. In 2019 — the club couldn’t host its race in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic — the club released 1,500 rubber ducks into Mill Pond.

The Rotary Club is working on launching a website that will allow residents to purchase tickets online for the first time, according to Leonard.