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APA to classify more than just Boreas Ponds tract

February 1, 2018
By JUSTIN A. LEVINE - Outdoors Writer (jlevine@adirondackdailyenterprise.com) , Lake Placid News

RAY BROOK - The state Adirondack Park Agency is expected to take up the largest state land classification package in its history this week, and while Boreas Ponds is drawing all the attention, there are 99 other parcels the agency board will vote on classifying.

The bulk of these are largely unsubstantial map corrections. Fifty-six clarifications will be dealt with by the APA board this week, as will 11 reclassifications.

Including the more than 11,000 acres of the Boreas Ponds Tract that will be added as Wilderness, more than 15,000 acres are slated to be given the state's most restrictive land designation. However, more than 17,000 acres - including about 9,000 at Boreas -?will be given a wild forest designation.

In addition to those two land classifications, the APA is slated to approved 161 acres designated as primitive, 108 acres as administrative, 75 acres intensive use and 2.5 acres of historic.

Perhaps the three most important tracts beyond Boreas are ecologically connected to that parcel.

The MacIntyre East and West tracts, along with the Casey Brook Tract, would, if approved, add significantly to the High Peaks Wilderness Area.

The MacIntyres abut parts of the High Peaks and portions of the tracts designated as wilderness will be added to that unit. The High Peaks will grow by 7,368 acres from MacIntyre West, while the East tract will add 4,446.6 acres.

Additionally, the 1,451-acre Casey Brook Tract will be added to the Dix Mountain Wilderness Area, and will connect the High Peaks to Dix Mountain. The resulting wilderness complex, including the new additions, would result in more than 250,000 acres of contiguous wilderness.

Several wild forest areas, such as Vanderwhacker and Debar Mountain, would see significant gains, as would the Hammond Pond Wild Forest in the Keene area.

The intensive use lands are largely parking areas, boat launches and state Department of Environmental Conservation campgrounds. The 2.5 acres of historic land are at the Santanoni great camp in Newcomb, and will allow the DEC to manage a farm complex and apple orchard to maintain their historical significance.

The Peninsula Trails in Lake Placid would be added to the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest, while the short but popular Belfry Mountain in Moriah is also slated to be added to the state Forest Preserve.

The site of Anne LaBastille's cabin in the western Adirondacks would be designated as wilderness and added to the Pigeon Lake Wilderness Area, while a right-of-way for power lines would be put into a classification of primitive. LaBastille was a prolific writer and Adirondack advocate who served on the APA board and whose hand-built log cabin was relocated to the Adirondack Experience [formerly the Adirondack Museum] in Blue Mountain Lake.

The APA has all of the proposed land designations and maps on its website at www.apa.ny.gov/Mailing/2018/02/stateLand.htm.

The agency's monthly meeting will be Thursday and Friday, Feb. 1-2, at APA headquarters in Ray Brook. The meeting starts at 9 a.m. on Thursday and at 9:30 a.m. on Friday.

 
 

 

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